Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face literary device

Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face literary device Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny: What I have spoke: but farewell compliment! 95: Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say ‘Ay;’ And I will take thy word; yet, if thou swear’st,Mar 07, 2012 · JULIET. " Source(s) Julius CaesarThe Glory of the LORD … 19 “I will cause all My goodness to pass before you,” the LORD replied, “and I will proclaim My name—the LORD—in your presence. But where hast thou been 50 then? Romeo says the Friar's right—he had a sweeter rest than sleep last night. Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain, I wash’d thy face, but more defects I saw, And rubbing off a spot, still made a flaw. Thou know’st the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny What I have spoke: but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say ‘Ay,’ And I will take thy word: yet if thou swear’st,Literary device: The literary device used in this quote is symbolism, because the lark symbolizes the day, and the nightingale symbolizes the night. When evils are most free? O, then by day. 3 years ago. His face will make the heavens so beautiful that the world will fall in love with the night and forget about the garish sun. 70% average accuracy What is the literary device is used when the words or acts of a character in a play are not fully understood by the character himself but are completely understood by the audience. " A poetic device used to address absent or imaginary Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face,Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheekFor that which thou hast heard me speak to-nightFain would I dwell on form, fain, fain denyWhat I have spoke: but farewell compliment!Dost thou love me?Jul. Whiter than new snow upon a raven’s back. This day is so boring that I feel like a child on the night before a holiday, waiting to put on my . What I have spoke: but farewell compliment! Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say `Ay;' 96. God pardon sin! Wast thou with Rosaline? ROMEO With Rosaline, my ghostly father? No. Played 330 times. Thou know’st the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek: For that which thou hast heard me speak to-night. by warrenj430. English. Hide it in smiles and affability. I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion. Where wilt thou find a cavern dark enough. 1. To mask thy monstrous visage? Seek none, conspiracy. Meaning/Significance: Juliet insists that it was the nightingale chirping in the tree, not the lark. Romeo & Juliet: Act II DRAFT. "The mask of night is on my face Feb 24, 2014 · Shamest thou to show thy dangerous brow by night. Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain, Thou ill-form’d offspring of my feeble brain, The Author to Her Book By Anne Bradstreet. Robert Frost wrote this poem for his friend Edward Thomas, as a joke. Lo, in these windows that let forth thy life I pour the helpless balm of my poor eyes. FRIAR LAWRENCE That’s my good son. ” 20 And He added, “You cannot see My face, for no one can see Me and live. Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face, Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek 92. 9th grade . For that which thou hast heard me speak tonight. Summary of “The Road Not Taken” Popularity: This poem was Written by Robert Frost and was published in 1961 as the first poem in the collection, Mountain Interval. ” 21 The LORD continued, “There is a place near Me where Come, thou day in night, For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night. Fain would I dwell on form, fain, fain deny . I have forgot that name and that name’s woe. The poem, having a perfect rhyme scheme, ‘ABAAB’ is an ambiguous poem that allows the readers to think about choices they make in life. The nightingale is out at night …"Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face, else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek for that which thou hast heard me speak tonight. And I will take thy word; yet, if thou swear'st,Poor key-cold figure of a holy king, Pale ashes of the house of Lancaster, Thou bloodless remnant of that royal blood, Be it lawful that I invocate thy ghost To hear the lamentations of poor Anne, Wife to thy Edward, to thy slaughtered son, Stabbed by the selfsame hand that made these wounds. Jul Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face literary device